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CERTIFICATES

Sometimes known as 'Authenticating Certificates' or 'Expertizing Certificates', these can be of help in determining the true status of a particular stamp. 

An expertizer (sometimes more than one) will check the authenticity and structural integrity of the stamp. 

Typically he or she will examine the perforations, gum, paper, cancel as well as any repairs, fading, toning or thins.  The appropriate Catalog number will be identified.

While an expertizing service strives to be consistent and accurate, the sheer volume of knowledge one needs to be 100% accurate all the time is in reality not always there.  Some will be more accurate than others.  All certificates should be regarded as 'opinions' only. 

When it comes to RHODESIA BSAC (pre-1924) material, the following observations have been noted:

1. Certificates issued prior to the year 2000 have little or no value and need to be updated.  Incidentally, APEX (APS) only guarantee their certificates for five years.

2. There is often a reason why higher value items do not have certificates - mostly because there is a 'problem' with the stamp.

3. For accuracy, 1910-13 'Double Heads' need to have their RSC classifications where applicable.  1913-24 'Admirals' need Die III separated into Die IIIA and IIIB.  Certificates that exist without this information might be uninformed, and a second opinion ought to be encouraged. 

4. Where the issuer of a certificate is not thoroughly experienced in the "RSC" classifications of Double Heads, the certificate has little or no worth other than that the stamp is 'genuine'.  The word 'Genuine' on a certificate does not mean correctly classified, nor does it mean the cancel (if there is one) is genuine.  It means the stamp is a genuine stamp as opposed to a fake stamp.

5.  Be especially cautious of certificates of postally-used material; the greater number of certificates issued have forged cancels, but are assumed genuine by ignorant expertizers; they don't have the level of competency required to make a correct call.  "No opinion on cancel" would be more appropriate certificate language.

6. Some Expertizing Services are more knowledgeable than others.

Certificates by Robert M. Gibbs,  Stephen Reah-Johnson (for Double Heads and Admirals), and the BPA Expertizing are in a trustworthy category of their own. 

FAULTY AND/OR FRAUDULENT CERTIFICATES:

Listed alphabetically:

 REF # APEX-01  

Certificate # 203935: 17 July, 2013.  See stamp below certificate.  Cited as "unused with original gum"; on examination the stamp proved to have a cleaned, fiscally-used cancel (yellow area on the shield) as well as several filled perfin holes and also regummed.  The APS withdrew the certificate, but the stamp is still floating around.

1091jcert

1091j-cert

REF # BACH-EICHELE-01 

Certificate #RHOD-93a-1: 29 March 2003/ See stamp below certificate.

While the stamp itself is genuine, it is definitely not "mint: or "apparently mint".

Rather, the stamp in question was once fiscally used (by perfin holes - typically the date). The perfin holes have since been filled (as can be seen from the scan).

Collectors of Rhodesia need to be on their guard when purchasing SG 93a mint.  The overwhelming number are fiscally used with perfin holes filled.

bach-eichele-1cert

bach-eichele-1

REF # BACH-EICHELE-02 

Certificate dated 28 1 2016 - see stamp below certificate. 

Experized as SG 143, the stamp is the much more common SG 141. 

bach-eichele-02-1

bach-eichele-02-2

bach-eichele-02-3

REF # BPA-01

Certificate # 24,609: 3 August, 1987.  See stamp below certificate.  The SG 154a is no longer considered to be a valid classification requiring a designated catalogue number, for which reason the BPA no longer issue certificates.  Older certificates like the one below should not be considered accurate in the light of current knowledge.  

bpa-01cert

 

bpa-01

REF # BRAN-01  

Certificate # 31365: 29 April, 2004.  See stamp below certificate.  Bearing a close approximation to the 'Diamond E' cancel, similar cancels to this one on high value BSAC stamp have been expertized as forged - often over a cleaned fiscal cancel or on an unused (gumless) stamp.  A second opinion is strongly recommended.  The use of a heavy cancel is an opportunistic choice for hiding any remains of fiscal cancels.

The number of genuine, postally-used £10 stamps are probabaly less than five.  These stamps were used for fiscal purposes, while a small number were remaindered with CTO cancels.

bran-1cert

 bran-1

REF # BRAN-02  

Certificate # 6378: 1 December, 1980.  See stamp below certificate.  Pre-1987, there was very little known amongst the expertizers of variants within the SG 185/185a group.  The Gibbs Double Head sale of that year was the watershed event that forever changed the classifications of Double Heads. 

It is now known that SG 185 has a variant, RSC-C, which has the purple nuance to the portrait color, and is often mistaken for SG 185a.  The stamp on this certificate is in fact RSC-C, which is a lot more common than SG 185a.  To classify an RSC-C as SG 185a would be an error in judgment.

bran-2cert

bran-2

REF # BRAN-03

Certificate # 26727: 19 January, 2001.  See stamp below certificate.  Expertized as SG 158a, the stamp would have to be from the 6th State of the Master Head Plate, known as the 'Short Gash 1" state of the plate. 

In fact, the stamp is clearly from the 1st State of the Head Plate, i.e., the 'Long Gash 1' state of the plate, which makes it the much more common SG 158 or RSC-A.

With the large range of color shades within the double heads, color should not be the primary means of identification; rather it is the state of the head plate that ought rightly to first be established.

bran-03cert

bran-03

 

REF # BRAN-04

Certificate # 43381 dated 6. 7. 2016.  See stamp below certificate.  Expertized as SG 160b (the Long Gash II Head-plate), the stamp is in fact SG 161 (the Long Gash I Head-plate).  SG 160b does not have the aniline frames - see reverse scan below. 

With the large range of color shades within the double heads, color should not be the primary means of identification; rather it is the state of the head-plate that ought rightly to first be established.

bran-04cert

bran-04

 

REF # DIENNA-01  

Dated September 18, 1985.  See stamp below certificate.  Despite the certificate stating a genuine postal cancellation, the cancel is in fact a crude SALISBURY forgery over what is likely a cleaned, fiscally-used cancel.  

dienna-01cert

dienna-01

REF # FRIEDL-01  

Certificate # 09306: February 6, 1981.  See stamp below certificate.  A forged cancel has been applied over a fiscal cancel, and then touch-ups of black ink applied to cover areas of fiscal ink.  Note the different color ink of the touch-ups compared to the cancel.  The stamp is genuine, but that is as far as it goes.

friedlcert

 

friedl

REF # HOLM-01  

Certificate # 1924/86: April 27, 1986.  See stamp below certificate.  The SG 154a is no longer considered to be a valid classification requiring a designated catalogue number, for which reason the BPA no longer issue certificates.  Older certificates like the one below should not be considered accurate in the light of current knowledge. 
holm-01cert

holm-01

 REF # PIN-01  

Certificate # 22123: November 5, 1985.  See stamp below certificate.  This is the common "Madame Joseph" forgery (REGISTERED, BULAWAYO - always with date JA 10 11) most likely over either a cleaned fiscal or an unused (gumless) stamp.  The stamp is genuine, but that is as far as it goes.

pinocert

 

pino

REF # PES-01  

Certificate # 21500: 21 January, 2011.  The name of the issuer is close enough to two established US-based organisations to sound like the real deal. 

Set aside that the PES ‘certificate’ has only a printed signature, the postcode on the document does not exist.  Its email address bounces back as 'undeliverable'.  The phone number does at least respond, but is answered by a surprised homeowner who has never heard of PES.  A totally scam outfit.

CertPES-1

 REF # PFSA-01  

Certificate # 14044: 8 February, 2014.  See stamp below certificate.  A forged cancel has been applied over either a cleaned fiscal or an unused (gumless) stamp.  The stamp is genuine, but that is as far as it goes. 

This certificate has since been rescinded by the PFSA, but both stamp and certificate are still floating around.

pfsa-1cert

pfsa-1

 REF # PFSA-02

Certificate # 5676: 18 January, 1981.  See stamp below certificate.  Expertized as SG 145a, the stamp would have to be from the Long Gash III state of the head-plate. 

In fact, the stamp is from 'Thick Ear' TE II (5) head-plate, which makes it the much more common RSC-H, a classification not widely understood in 1981. 

With the large range of color shades within the double heads, color should not be the primary means of identification; rather it is the state of the head plate that ought rightly to first be established.

pfsa-2cert

pfsa-2

 

REF # PFSA-03

Certificate # 12175: 11 March, 2007.  See stamp below certificate.  Expertized as "genuine", the stamp in fact has a crude, forged KOPJE, SALISBURY cancel.   

pfsa-03cert

pfsa-03

 

REF # PFSA-04

Certificate # 6627: 15 May, 1982.  See stamp below certificate.  Expertized as "genuine", the stamp in fact has a crude, forged KOPJE, SALISBURY cancel.

pfsa-04cert

pfsa-04

REF # PFSA-05

Certificate # 4670: 8 Sept, 1979.  See stamp below certificate.  Expertized as "genuine", the stamp in fact has a crude, forged cancel.

 pfsa-05cert

pfsa-05

 

REF # PFSA-06

Certificate # 5689: 18 Jan, 1981.  See stamp below certificate.  Expertized as "genuine", the stamp in fact has a crude, forged cancel - most likely over a cleaned fiscal.

pfsaa-06cert

pfsa-06

REF # RPS-01  

Certificate # 177230: 27 September, 2000.  See stamp below certificate.  For our education, this is what a certificate should look like for a stamp that has a forged cancel. 

rps-1cert

rps-1

REF # RPS-02

Certificate # 183998: 15 January, 2003.  See stamp below certificate.  Expertized as SG 145a, the stamp would have to be from the 'Long Gash III" head-plate. 

In fact, the stamp is clearly from the 'Long Gash I' state of the plate, which makes it the much more common SG 144 - one of the many shades. 

With the large range of color shades within the double heads, color should not be the primary means of identification; rather it is the state of the head plate that ought rightly to first be established.

rps-02cert

rps-02

REF # RPS-03

Certificate # 148347: 5 April, 1989.  See stamp below certificate.  Expertized as SG 145a, the stamp would have to be from the Long Gash III state of the plate. 

In fact, the stamp is from the 'Long Gash 1' state of the plate, which makes it the much more common SG 144 - one of the many shades. 

With the large range of color shades within the double heads, color should not be the primary means of identification; rather it is the state of the head plate that ought rightly to first be established.

rps-03cert

rps-03

REF # RPS-04

Certificate # 66484: 3 July, 1968.  See stamp below certificate.  Expertized as genuine, and indeed, the stamp is genuine.  The cancels are the well-known KALOMO STATION forgery by "Madame Joseph" (found on innumerable one pound Admirals).

10279decert

10279de-cert 

REF # RPS-05

Certificate # 123772: 26 January, 1983.  See stamp below certificate.  Expertized as genuine, and indeed, the stamp is genuine.  The cancel is a crude forgery. 

rps-05cert

rps-05

 REF # RPS-06

Certificate # 29,958: 27 March, 1947.  See stamp below certificate.  Expertized as genuine, and indeed, the stamp is genuine.  The cancel is the well-known LOMOGUNDI forgery (perhaps not so well-known in 1947).

rps-06cert

 

rps-06

 REF # RPS-07

Certificate # 187750: 7 April 2004.  See stamp below certificate.  

In the history of double head expertizing certificates, this must be the most colossal blunder ever visited upon the collecting public.

Expertized as SG 146, the stamp can in no way, shape or form be considered SG 146.  

For starters, SG 146 does not exist genuinely, postally used (the Stanley Gibbons Catalogue correctly does not place a retail price on it as used - you would have thought that fact alone should have raised a red flag).

There is one known SG 146 "used" but this stamp has a forged cancel - an attempt by an opportunistic individual to create a unique item, which in fact has devalued it considerably.

The stamp with the certificate appears to be an SG 147, or a very washed out SG 148, or even an SG 185 (if Perf. 13.7).  Value on a good day in 2018 about $10.

rps-07cert

rps-07

REF # RPS-08

Certificate # 221111: 24 June 2015.  See stamp below certificate.  


The SG 154a is no longer considered to be a valid classification requiring a designated SG catalogue number.  The BPA no longer issues certificates for SG 154a.  The RPS (nor Stanley Gibbons) have not gotten the message yet, it seems.  Consequently certificates purporting to identify SG 154a should be considered inaccurate in the light of new understanding of the Double Head issue.

rps-08cert

rps-08

 

 

REF # RPS-09

Certificate # 183243: 2 Oct 2002.  See stamp below certificate.  

The stamp and surcharge are genuine but not "genuine used". The certificate fails to mention that the cancel is a forgery.

rps-09cert

rps-09

 

 

REF # RPS-10

Certificate # 151011: 17 Jan 1990. See stamp below certificate.  

Expertized as being the rare SG 146 - which it is not - not even close. The stamp is the common SG 148 - as about as representative of this printing as one can get.

rps-10cert

 rps-10

REF # SIS-01

Dated: 13 April, 2006.  See stamp below certificate.  Expertized as SG 163, the stamp would have to be from the 'Hook III" head-plate. 

In fact, the stamp is clearly the 'Long Gash I' head-plate, which makes it the much more common SG 164. 

With the large range of color shades within the double heads, color should not be the primary means of identification; rather it is the state of the head plate that ought rightly to first be established.

sis-01cert

sis-01